Third Brighton player tests positive for coronavirus ahead of Premier League Project Restart

Brighton chairman Paul Barber has confirmed a third member of their playing squad has tested positive for coronavirus as doubts persist over the Premier League Project Restart


Posted Monday, May 11, 2020 by Dailystar.co.uk

The Premier League's Project Restart has been thrown into fresh doubt with a third Brighton and Hove Albion player testing positive for coronavirus.

Chief executive Paul Barber, who had previously confirmed two players had contracted the COVID-19 virus, told Sky Sports a third unnamed player had tested positive.

The news comes as the Premier League ramp up plans to return to training and eventually resume the season amid ongoing concerns from players, clubs and fans over proposals.

"It is a concern," Barber told Sky Sports News.

"Unfortunately we've had a third player test positive yesterday (Saturday, May 9), so despite all of the measures that we've been taking over the past few weeks, where the players haven't been involved in any significant training at all, we've still suffered another player testing positive for the virus.

Third Brighton player tests positive for coronavirus ahead of Premier League Project Restart
A third Brighton player has tested positive for coronavirus

"So there are concerns and I think it's normal for all clubs to have those concerns. We want to make sure we do everything that we can to ensure those protocols are in place and are safe and secure and mitigate the risk as far as we can."

Barber has been vocal in how the coronavirus crisis will impact Brighton and has been amongst those to strongly oppose finishing the season at neutral venues.

He has branded the plans as "totally illogical to the point of being dangerous" as he highlighted concerns over lack of knowledge over where medical supplies are if there is no home side.

He told the Daily Mail: "In the situation that is being proposed, we would be pushing two teams into a venue they are not familiar with, where the home medics wouldn't exist because they would be somewhere else in the country with their team.

"That is totally illogical to the point of being dangerous. At these times of all times, a medical emergency has got to be managed super carefully for obvious reasons. And yet we are asking two teams of medics to operate in unfamiliar surroundings should that happen. How is that logical?

"Normally, even if you are the away team, you would have the comfort that the medics of the home team, not least out of professional courtesy and duty, rush on to help you and advise you.

"We have got to be careful that we do not misstep here because if we do misstep, it could ruin lives. It could cost lives and it could ruin lives. And we cannot afford that. We just can't."



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